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Poster:notapoet47
Date:2013-06-06 10:10
Subject:
Security:Public

Hello!

1. I'm looking for books of Persian poetry or literature that have both the Persian text and good English translations. I just got "The Tragedy of Sohrab and Rostam," but other books would be appreciated, especially if they are a part of Shahname.

2. I am really struggling with the غ and ق sounds. I've been practicing them like crazy, but does anyone have any tips?

3. Also, a website that may be helpful for others: http://chap.sch.ir/ It has lots of Iranian schoolbooks available for download!

Mersi!

(2 gofteh | ezhār-e nazar kon)





Poster:klausnick
Date:2011-01-15 09:52
Subject:shikaste
Security:Public

http://sovet.geraldika.ru/images/lj/Fathaligrant.jpg

This official document (firman) written in shikasteh, the primary chancery script of the Qajars, declares that Fath 'Ali Shah (r. 1798-1834 CE) honours Sir Hartford Jones, the British envoy to Iran in 1809-11 CE, with an order which is depicted at the right. Does anybody possess information about this script? Any manuels or somethibg of the kind?
Thanks in advance.

(4 gofteh | ezhār-e nazar kon)





Poster:_anneke_
Date:2010-09-09 10:52
Subject:Multi-lingual Glossary of Idioms
Security:Public

Do you know what an English idiom push up daisies mean? Well, now with WikIdioms, you can know in no time. WikIdioms is a new collaborative effort of translators and language lovers who have created first Internet multilingual dictionary of idiomatic expressions. It is both useful and fun! Everyone can also contribute expressions that he knows. Visit WikIdioms, educate yourself, translate idioms, contribute, have fun!

Idiom translation is one hardest translation-related tasks. Idioms cannot be translated literally, as it will result in non-sense. In order to translate an idiom one should find the equivalent expression in the second language. It requires deep familiarity with the language and knowing the specifics of its metaphorical speech. WikIdioms is in fact a multilingual dictionary of idioms, created by native language speakers.

You can find a lot of Persian idioms translated to English and vice versa.

(1 gofteh | ezhār-e nazar kon)





Poster:opheliasv
Date:2010-02-15 18:32
Subject:Rosetta Stone
Security:Public

I'm a beginner learner of Farsi.  Until I can attend a class, I've been using Pimsleur and Rosetta Stone to give me a basic understanding of the language.  I have to say, though, that I'm finding Rosetta Stone to be highly disappointing.  I feel like I have learned more from the time I've invested in Pimsleur than I have in the hours of frustration with Rosetta Stone.  Am I alone in this?  Thankfully, I have it for free but I am seriously considering discontinuing my studies with Rosetta Stone and turning to alternative sites I've seen posted in this community.  Thoughts?  Rosetta co-miseration?

(2 gofteh | ezhār-e nazar kon)





Poster:lair_of_fenrir
Date:2010-02-08 19:40
Subject:Dari/Tajiki Resources?
Security:Public

Does anyone know of any good material in these two dialects? I already have the Pimsleur Dari CDs and the Dari For Aid Workers book from Rodnik Publishing and am curious if there are any more good items in these dialects.

Thanks

(ezhār-e nazar kon)





Poster:awibs
Date:2010-01-07 14:03
Subject:a question about hijab in iranian american culture
Security:Public

I have a question about Iranian funeral etiquette and I apolgize if I am asking in the wrong place.

My uncle's memorial service is at the Islamic Cultural Center of Chicago this Sunday. I do not know if I will be expected to wear hijab, or a chador, or what.

I am not hijabi nor a practicing muslim. My father was Shi'ite Iranian and my mother is Chinese Buddhist and I was consensually raised to be pantheistic. I have never, ever seen any of my female Iranian Shi'ite relatives were hijab in the States, only when they visit to Iran or for things like funerals. However when they do wear hijab it is always black. I think most of the websites I can find with information on how to wear hijab are Arabic of some form or sometimes African because they feature fabrics of all kinds of bright colors and Iranians always, in my experience wear black. Even when not in hijab Iranians wear a lot of black in my experience. I have also never seen any of them wear a chador, not even in photos from Iran. All the Iranian-specific websites say Iranian women wear chadors, but my family doesn't. The only time I have been to the Islamic Center before was for my own father's memorial service, but I was seven and I don't honestly remember it very well. I remember that something covered my head but I don't clearly remember what my mother dressed me in - and even if I did remember she is the Chinese one, and recently bereaved with her grief to deal with, so who knows how correct it was.

Can anyone please advise me on how I ought to dress for my uncle's memorial service?

Thank you.

(3 gofteh | ezhār-e nazar kon)





Poster:cookietribble
Date:2009-09-29 16:53
Subject:Persian Music recommendation?
Security:Public
Mood:busy

This has probably been asked a thousand times before, but I'll just ask anyways ;):

Can anyone recommend Persian music to me? Anything is fine, from traditional to Pop, Rock, Electro, whatever. :)
Browsing YouTube gives you thousands of songs, I was just curious what other people would recommend/like/what is popular right now.

Thank you so much! :)

(3 gofteh | ezhār-e nazar kon)





Poster:majgaa
Date:2009-09-07 21:59
Subject:re: persian lullabies
Security:Public

does anybody have persian lullaby lyrics in english and farsi?

(ezhār-e nazar kon)





Poster:imfinallyfound
Date:2009-08-18 20:41
Subject:Aryamehr
Security:Public

Can someone tell me anything you know about the use of the title "Aryamehr"? Basically, before the revolution, was it predominantly used to refer to a man who held a high rank or status in the community? If not this title, what titles were bestowed upon men in Iran before the 1979 revolution, but are controvertial to use after the revolution . By titles I mean "Sir, Mr., General, Sarkar, Shahanshah, etc.) I hope my question isn't confusing. Any help is appreciated.

(ezhār-e nazar kon)





Poster:maniavanti
Date:2009-07-27 13:13
Subject:
Security:Public

Is anyone able to identify the song sung in this video? It would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!


(3 gofteh | ezhār-e nazar kon)





Poster:imfinallyfound
Date:2009-06-23 11:40
Subject:Protests
Security:Public

Anyone know of any protests in Southern California for Iran?

(1 gofteh | ezhār-e nazar kon)





Poster:itzar
Date:2009-05-21 21:09
Subject:Persian help?
Security:Public

Can anyone here tell me what the sign in this picture says?

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Khayli mamnoon!

(1 gofteh | ezhār-e nazar kon)





Poster:cookietribble
Date:2009-05-04 18:09
Subject:
Security:Public

Salaam everyone,

I've recently started to learn Persian and like it a lot so far. :D
My question, however, is the following:

Does any of you have advice on how to pronounce the uvular [ɢ] that appears, for example,  in باغ (ba[g], garden)?

I just can't seem to get it right, no matter what I try.

Thanks in advance!




(5 gofteh | ezhār-e nazar kon)





Poster:lair_of_fenrir
Date:2009-05-03 21:33
Subject:Paper dictionary recommendations?
Security:Public

'Allo again.

I'm looking for a good paper dictionary so I can look up words when I'm away from my computer. Are there any particularly good ones I should try to get?

Thanks.

(1 gofteh | ezhār-e nazar kon)





Poster:maniavanti
Date:2009-04-02 20:03
Subject:Persian song
Security:Public


Hello! I was wondering if anyone here was familiar with the beginning of this song, called "Flames" from the 2004 film "Crash," specifically from the beginning until 1:30. I know that it's sung in Persian by Sima Bina but I've been unsuccessful in locating any lyrics or even what the song she's singing is called (I've heard that it's a traditional Persian folk song, but that could be wrong). Would anyone here be willing to give it a quick listen and perhaps identify the song? Or perhaps provide me with the lyrics in Persian and English? I feel like I'm asking for a lot, so any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!


(2 gofteh | ezhār-e nazar kon)





Poster:lizardqueen13
Date:2009-03-28 21:17
Subject:
Security:Public

salam beh hame.

i have a question about a persian movie i saw many years ago that i don't know the name of. it had a brother and a sister and the sister had four dolls ( a crow, a doll, a dog, and a robot) and there was this lady who drank a potion that made her into a man. and then the man took the kids into a dungeon with a spider in it. and there was a detective looking for the kids.

does anyone know the name of this movie?

(ezhār-e nazar kon)





Poster:basal_ganglia
Date:2009-03-27 12:23
Subject:Titles and word order
Security:Public

سلام و نوروز مبارک به همهء شما

I am writing an email to a professor at my university, with whom I'm on a first-name basis over email, and would like to address him in Persian. Our textbook teaches us to precede last names with titles in what I think is the genitive, such as آقای سعیدی, but I seem to also remember that in colloquial Persian, it is possible to follow a person's first name with their title, as in:

آنا خانم

or

تیگون آقا

Am I remembering this usage correctly? If so, may other titles, such as استاد, be used in this way? Should the titles only be used with first or last names, or is it flexible?

خیلی ممنون برای کمکتان

(5 gofteh | ezhār-e nazar kon)





Poster:little_red_book
Date:2009-03-26 03:15
Subject:tools & other stuff
Security:Public

Salam be hamegi! 


Here's the scoop: my current Persian-English/English-Persian is awful. I would really, really like to burn it--it's kind of a necessary evil, because my vocabulary is extremely limited. Does anyone have suggestions for a complete noob? I've heard Aryanpour is really good; however, it's really expensive and isn't bi-directional. Bi-directional is good for me, as is English transliteration and an example here and there. (The one thing that I DO like about my current tome is the fact that it denotes which words are colloquial, and which ones come from Arabic.) 


Also, does anyone have suggestions for breaking away from Finglish? I think half the beauty of Persian is the script, but I'm having a hard time learning to read! Patience is good, but so is not feeling like a first grader. :)


Kheyli mamnun in advance!

(4 gofteh | ezhār-e nazar kon)





Poster:basal_ganglia
Date:2009-03-03 22:02
Subject:Any clues on the origin of these poetry excerpts?
Security:Public

سلام به همه

The other night I was poking around on Farsi123, working on my weekly Persian journal assignment and trying to figure out if there were another verb in common use for "to love" besides دوست داشتن .

One of the examples given on the page seemed to be a poetry excerpt. I found it very simple, yet affecting. However, there was no mention of its origin.

The English translation given is:
You who are fully despairing, turn to love

The Persian given is (pasted from the site, there may be spacing issues):
ای‌که مایوس از همه از سویی به‌سوی عشق روکن

Is this a line of poetry? If so, do you have any idea whose poem it might be from?

How about this one?
English:
O, bird of dawn, learn love from the moth

Persian:
ای مرغ سحر عشق ز پروانه بیاموز

خیلی ممنون

(8 gofteh | ezhār-e nazar kon)





Poster:lair_of_fenrir
Date:2009-02-07 00:28
Subject:One More Question
Security:Public

I ran across something that sounded like مي تنام حارف بزانام translated as "I am able to speak" - I understand مي تنام as "I am able" and بزانام as "I speak", but what sort of function does the middle word serve?

My spelling is probably off a bit. That exercise doesn't have a written portion.

(4 gofteh | ezhār-e nazar kon)




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